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CPC campaigns to cut regulatory red tape
2013/08/29
 

BEIJING, Aug. 28  -- The Communist Party of China's (CPC) first campaign to cut regulatory red tape has seen the abolition of nearly 40 percent of its intra-Party rules introduced by the central authority since 1978.

In the clearing-up move, 300 of the 767 regulations or normative documents introduced by the central authority have been abolished or nullified, according to a CPC Central Committee circular made public on Wednesday.

Forty-two of the remaining 467 ones still in effect will undergo revisions, the document said.

Those abolished or nullified were deemed either inconsistent with the CPC Constitution and policies or the country's Constitution and laws due to changes in the Party or national conditions, or were judged to overlap each other, according to the circular.

Under the plan, the party's discipline watchdog, the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection of the CPC, various departments of the central authority, and local Party committees have also been checking through more than 20,000 regulations and normative documents in their jurisdiction.

Initiated in June 2012, the first stage of the campaign focused on rules introduced since 1978.

The second stage, which is to begin in October this year, will target those introduced from the founding of the New China in 1949 to 1978.

The campaign is expected to conclude by the end of 2014, according to the circular, which added that the CPC will carry out a similar clean-up every five years in future.

"The move is significant for the CPC to get a thorough idea of its regulatory situation, ensure coordination among different rules, speed up establishment of its intra-Party regulatory system, and build the Party in a more scientific way," the circular said.

In this document, the CPC Central Committee urged related authorities to better carry out the regulations which remain effective, enhance supervision, and strictly deal with violators so as to safeguard the authority of intra-Party rules.

 

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